Use sysresccd to mount XP Windows Dynamic Disk RAID0

Topics about disk partitioning (fdisk, parted, gparted, partimage), Volumes Management (lvm, evms, dmraid), Storage, file systems, ...
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tgice
Posts: 3
Joined: 08 Oct 2007, 16:22

Use sysresccd to mount XP Windows Dynamic Disk RAID0

Post by tgice » 08 Oct 2007, 16:34

Hi, I've got a Windows XP machine setup with two Windows Dynamic Disk IDE drives setup and visible as /dev/hda and /dev/hdd when booting with sysresccd.

After much wandering around the web (with Google as a guide, of course), I determined that it is likely possible through a couple of different approaches, such as those outlined here:

http://lxr.linux.no/source/Documentatio ... s/ntfs.txt

to make my two partitions that are seen as one RAID0 in XP (hda2 and hdd1) visible as a single one in /dev/mapper (or something like that) and then to use ntfs-3g to make the NTFS on that RAID1 read/write, which is my end goal here.

The question is, how to do this in sysresccd if it's possible with the installed tools. I'm using the latest stable version of the cd from a few months back, and a few of the commands that I tried to use, such as dmraid, raid0*, ldm* are apparently not available on that version. I suspect that perhaps they've been deprecated by later approaches to this.

Has anyone else done this successfully with sysresccd? Is it possible without much fooling around (or at all)?

I tried something like this:

mdadm --create /dev/md0 --level=linear --chunk=64 --raid-devices=2 /dev/hda2 /dev/hdd1

with a couple of variations (such as using "build" instead of "create" and different levels, etc.), but ntfs3-g was never able to find a good NTFS structure on the resulting /dev/md0.

I appreciate any input. If I figure anything else, I'll come back and post my results. Thanks.

tgice
Posts: 3
Joined: 08 Oct 2007, 16:22

Post by tgice » 09 Oct 2007, 14:47

I finally solved this, after at least a few hours of messing around over a few days.

The short version is, this command worked:

Code: Select all

mdadm --build /dev/md0 --level=linear --chunk=64 --raid-devices=2 /dev/hdd1 /dev/hda2
on my two disk (/dev/hda and /dev/hdd) Windows Dynamic Disk setup where /dev/hda1 is my boot partition (that I'm wanting to partimage, by the way) and /dev/hda2 + /dev/hdd1 are the two partitions in the RAID1 (or linear) Windows striped volume.

The reason I didn't figure this out earlier was due to the order of the devices in the mdadm command. I naturally assumed that the hda2 should be first, but that would never allow ntfs-3g to mount the volume. Once I switched them, it magically worked.

As a side note, I thought to try that after running:

Code: Select all

ldminfo --dump /dev/hda
(sysresccd didn't seem to have that tool, so I went here:

http://www.linux-ntfs.org/doku.php?id=downloads

and downloaded the "linux-ldm" package, which helpfully contained a precompiled (x86, I guess) version of ldinfo which I rsync'd from my notebook over to the machine I was doing this sysresccd work on)

In the output of ldminfo, it appeared that hdd1 was labeled as "disk0" and hda2 as "disk1"... I thought that was odd and then had the idea of reversing the partitions in the mdadm command.

I suppose Windows might've reversed their order like that since hdd1 is much larger than hda1.

I was able to use this approach to have two hdds show up in Windows as just two logical drives (one for boot, the other large volume for data, etc.) and even make image backups with partimage from the boot volume into the large data volume, thanks to partimage, mdadm and ntfs-3g.

Tuipveus
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Joined: 18 Nov 2006, 13:09
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Post by Tuipveus » 01 Jan 2008, 14:02

So are you saying that it is possible to use same "raided" partitions with both Windows software raid (aka Windows Dynamic Disk) and Linux? I didn't know that this is possible...

Have you made some big file inside ntfs, which contains linux file system? How does it work? Have you made any speed tests. Right now I am using hardware raid-3, because I thought that hardware-raid is only option if you want use raid on both Linux and Windows with same harddrives.

tgice
Posts: 3
Joined: 08 Oct 2007, 16:22

Post by tgice » 02 Jan 2008, 04:41

Tuipveus wrote:So are you saying that it is possible to use same "raided" partitions with both Windows software raid (aka Windows Dynamic Disk) and Linux? I didn't know that this is possible...

Have you made some big file inside ntfs, which contains linux file system? How does it work? Have you made any speed tests. Right now I am using hardware raid-3, because I thought that hardware-raid is only option if you want use raid on both Linux and Windows with same harddrives.
The reason I did this work was to enable me to use Partimage to image a regular Windows XP boot partition to another (Windows) single logical partition that happened to be made up of two physical partitions (as described above) that was built in Windows XP. Previously, I always used to use Ghost for this, but the versions I have access to only write to FAT partitions so this required various fooling around.

I have not conducted any benchmarking or speed tests, but yes, large files are created by Partimage and I believe they work fine. I'd encourage you to do some testing if you're interested -- it may very well work for you.

soft1314
Posts: 1
Joined: 13 Oct 2010, 06:56

Re: Use sysresccd to mount XP Windows Dynamic Disk RAID0

Post by soft1314 » 13 Oct 2010, 07:04

Wow.
Dynamic disk. I was interested in it.
And I have learned much about the dynamic disk from the internet.
I found that the users usually confused by the conversion from dynamic disk to basic disk.
And they often ask for help on the internet.
So, I also found the solution for a long time, now, share with you. I know this is not related with your topic, but I just want everybody know this way.
Dynamic Disk Converter, maybe you have heard of this, but you have no chance to experience its superiority. This software can convert dynamic disk to basic disk with the data security--in other words, you do not have to delete all the dynamic volumes as the windows built-in disk management do.
dynamic-disk.com/convert-dynamic-disk-to-basic.html

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